My kittens just got spayed at Peggy Adams

This is Joli. She is a calico kitten 4 months old now, and Nick's baby. Nick is 10 years old.

This is Joli. She is a calico kitten 4 months old now, and Nick’s baby. Nick is 10 years old.

Joli and Molli have grown up so fast. Even though it has only been 4 months since they were born, I feel like they are teenagers already. They no longer rely on me the way they did a few months ago. They get around so well that many times I feel I live with Speedy Gonzales. One minute I am looking at them and the next I am searching for where they went.

This week marked a new milestone for Joli and Molli. They were spayed. It is always as scary event to drop off one of your kids for surgery. Yes, I had that nervous feeling when I brought them to Peggy Adams at 8am and could not see them until 4:30 that evening. When Nick, Mira, and I arrived with two cages, each containing one of the four legged babies, I started getting a nervous stomach. There were so many other people here for the same thing that I worried if my kittens would be safe and marked with their names appropriately. I had a fear of returning for them only to find out they could not be found. We adopted them when they were just 2 weeks old. Learn more about becoming a kitten mom and raising baby kittens here.

 

Nick and Mira helped me stay busy by stopping for breakfast at Dunkin Donuts. Then we headed to Publix for groceries. I never arrive early in the morning to grocery shop. I was amazed when I walked in and found it almost empty. For a moment it felt like we were royalty and that Publix opened just for us. That thought was quickly vanished when I saw a few others walking around shopping too.

Meet Molli. She is our other kitten. We adopted her and her sister when they were just 2 weeks old.

Meet Molli. She is our other kitten. We adopted her and her sister when they were just 2 weeks old.

We returned promptly at 4:30pm to collect the kittens. After checking in we sat, mostly patiently, waiting for the vet technician to bring them out. It seemed like everyone was being returned their four legged children but us. While waiting, Nick lucked out and was escorted in the private employee area for a tour. This happened as a result of his inquisitive nature. When we signed in to collect Joli and Molli, Nick started asking questions. He was thinking of volunteering next summer if they would allow him to do so. This request was shot down because they have no one to watch children that volunteer and therefore the age requirement is 17 to volunteer. From this line of questioning came new questions about the procedure and how the stitches work, to what medicine our kittens were given. Without a word, this employee excused himself from the desk and found us in the waiting room, where he invited Nick on a tour.

This tour was amazing. Nick learned how the procedure is done and all the steps involved. He even witnessed a cat with the breathing tube that was about to be spayed, lying on the table in wait. A few minutes after Nick’s return both kittens were brought to us. Molli seemed alert however; Joli was still groggy. We purchased cone helmets for both kittens to keep them from licking their wounds. Watching the kittens wear the one size helmets was funny. Molli would take off running only to roll head over heels because her paw got caught on the helmet. Nick devised a plan for them to eat. Originally two glass plates were put down with food on them, but they would step on the edge of the plate and the food would fly into the air landing everywhere but in their mouths. Their helmet was bend forward at the bottom serving like a scoop. Food was put in the scooped area and the kittens would lay down using the helmet for a food bowl. Leave it to kids to come up with a quick and easy solution without compromising the surgery with the removal of the helmet.

It has been two days now since surgery and they are becoming bitter at being cooped up. The minute the bathroom door opens they bolt out scraping their helmet along the wall and falling while trying to escape. Once they regain their composure they take off again running up the hamper and diving off the top of it only to land back on the ground in a full run. So much for keeping them calm and relaxed. The plan has failed. Every moment they are apart from us they cry and cry trying to get us to come back and stay with them. Finally their master plan worked and I allowed them out of the bathroom for the night. I even removed their helmet for fear they would not see their feet and walk directly off a piece of furniture and get hurt. They were happy to have freedom again and showed this by playing like their normal self did before surgery. They even slept in the bed next to me. Of course, as a parent, I did not get much sleep since I was worrying about them every moment. At one time during the night one of them started crying and I jumped up thinking something happened to their stitches. I might have imagined the cries because when I turned on the light they appeared to be sleeping.

I thought I was losing my mind but in fact it was that mother instinct that came out. I went through this when my children were little. I could hear a pin drop when I was sleeping or maybe I was really just resting.  I can’t wait for their stitches to heal properly giving me peace of mind.

Reasons to spay your animal are these: Find out more reasons here. 

Avoid unwanted babies

Help Prevent (breast) cancer.  Females spayed prior to their first estrus cycle have a significantly reduced risk of developing a common cancer in unspayed females.

Females may be less aggressive toward both dogs and people after they’re spayed. 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Vicki Brown in Love